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Automotive

Volkswagen
Hack-a-Thon Activity, 2019

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1. What was the objective?

Volkswagen wanted to engage their Customer Experience & Marketing Teams to work on three areas where they saw opportunity for possibility and improvement. ‘Customer’s Lived Experience’, ‘Brand fame and Talkability’ and ‘Sales Uplift’ were the three areas that each team focused on. The objective was to produce the best concept that would then be funded and put into market.

2. How did we do it?

Volkswagen’s group of 50 was split into smaller groups of six, bringing people with different skills sets and experience together to ideate on and design a concept. The Hack was completed over two sessions. The first session was a two hour ‘kick off’, where we assigned people to teams, explained the brief and set expectations. There was then a three-week gap between brief and pitch where the teams could research, understand, explore, align and define what they would pitch. The final session was a half day ‘pitch session’ where each group refined their ideas and engaged in on-the-spot mentoring from external experts. Each group then pitched their ideas and two ideas were awarded funding to be put to market.

3. How was it integrated and what were the results?

The two winning pitches were awarded initial funding, so the concepts could be built and put to market. The leader of each of the winning teams lead the project and each member of the pitch team assumed responsibilities to make it happen. Over time, each concept was made ‘business as usual’ as it was integrated into everyday life at Volkswagen. The business went on to complete an additional Hack-A-Thon, where two more ideas were generated and integrated.

Volkswagen
100 ways to ‘WOW’, 2019

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1. What was the objective?

Volkswagen wanted to publish two books – Book 1: ‘100 ways to WOW Employees’ and Book 2: ‘100 ways to WOW Customers’. The objective was to take two days and produce 200 ideas! We needed to brainstorm 120 ideas per topic in each 8 hour day – to allow a review process that eliminated ideas that didn’t live up to standards.

2. How did we do it?

Each day took a three-part approach. The morning was spent doing a personal creative activity. After this, the group came together to get as many ideas out as possible. The facilitator then lead a conversation which helped the group to probe and produce more ideas. The next chunk of time was spent working in small groups to refine ideas, eliminate ideas and create ‘worthy’ ideas. The last part of each day was spent reviewing all ideas, grading them, and putting together the final list of 120 ideas.

3. How was it integrated and what were the results?

At the conclusion of each day, a final list was sent to stakeholders for review. Once this was completed, a book was published with the 100 ideas inside it – one to a page, beautifully designed. Statements like ‘Better experienced than explained’ and ‘Don’t be afraid to try new things’ were cemented in the 100 ideas. The books were then given to each business leader at a conference.